Sunday, November 8, 2015

Illegal Aliens Upset:

Can’t Get “Assistance” Because They Are Here Illegally 

The wildfires of late summer in Northern California destroyed homes, farms, forests and crops. It destroyed lives of hardworking, honest Californians. Many assistance programs to restore their lives are from FEMA, plus State and Federal programs. Now we find illegal aliens complaining that since they have broken the law and here illegally, our government will not help them. They should be happy, we are not deporting them.

“”We lost everything because we couldn’t salvage anything,” Patricia Madrigal says. Her and her family’s immigration status is complicating their losses during California’s recent Valley Fire, north of Napa.

Madrigal unloads donated clothes into her new temporary home: a yellow dome tent at a campground outside the small community of Middletown. Her eyes fill with tears.

“It was all of the sudden. We were living in the moment because it was so traumatic,” she says.

Madrigal moved to California from Mexico illegally seven years ago. Since then, she has washed dishes for a retreat center.” ‘

Yet your tax dollars going to National Public Radio is being used to create sympathy for a law breaker. I wonder which honest Californian should do without so we can help those that have no respect for our laws? Why hasn’t this person been deported—they have broken our laws—and even the media can find them, why can’t ICE.


                                    

Proof Of Citizenship Up In Flames After California Wildfires

Lesley McClurg, NPR, 11/4/15

A swing set is all that remains in the backyard of a house in Middletown, Calif., after a devastating wildfire. Birth certificates and marriage licenses were among the important things destroyed.

Homeless fire victims live in tents like these in Middletown, Calif. Patricia Madrigal’s tent is yellow and gray.

When a wildfire destroys a home, it leaves people’s lives in disarray. For undocumented workers — many of whom don’t have insurance or savings — it’s even harder to recover.

“We lost everything because we couldn’t salvage anything,” Patricia Madrigal says. Her and her family’s immigration status is complicating their losses during California’s recent Valley Fire, north of Napa.

Madrigal unloads donated clothes into her new temporary home: a yellow dome tent at a campground outside the small community of Middletown. Her eyes fill with tears.

“It was all of the sudden. We were living in the moment because it was so traumatic,” she says.

Madrigal moved to California from Mexico illegally seven years ago. Since then, she has washed dishes for a retreat center.

Now that center and Madrigal’s home are ashes.

“The little that we had is gone,” she says.

That includes her Mexican marriage license, her daughter’s birth certificate and any proof that the family has lived in the U.S.

She has contacted the Mexican Consulate to see if duplicates can be made, but so far, the process has been overwhelming.

“I’m so sad for what happened. We never imagined this,” she says.

Madrigal’s 19-year-old daughter, Jacqueline Burgueno, sits hunched over on an ice chest just outside her tent, listening to her mom cry. Burgueno was home alone when she had to evacuate.

“I didn’t get anything. I was too nervous to grab anything,” Burgueno says.

Everything was lost, including her work permit and her Social Security card. Burgueno was born in Tijuana but she has temporary legal status under the federal policy Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

read more:>>>>Here


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